Green Chile & Hominy Stew

Happy New Year everyone. I think it’s fitting to say goodbye to 2020 and welcome 2021, with food that signifies progress and forward movement. So DP and I are ringing in the new year with what has quickly become one of our favorite pork stews. I love Pozole, and DP’s been talking about making Hatch Green Chile Stew for as long we’ve been together, so we recently developed a hybrid of these two New Mexico classics. The result is a humble stew that highlights the flavor of fire roasted New Mexico chiles, succulent pork shoulder, and the satisfyingly soft and chewy texture of hominy.

Hatch peppers are grown only in the Hatch Valley of New Mexico, and are similar to Anaheim peppers or Cubanelle peppers. Here on the east coast, roasted Hatch green chiles are widely available canned or jarred in the supermarket. For this stew I like the ones from Zia Green Chile Company. They contain a little lime juice, salt, and garlic which gives the stew an extra boost of flavor. If I got my hands on some fresh Hatch peppers and roasted them myself I’m sure they would be amazing, but for this recipe I’m going for maximum flavor with minimal effort.

After making this recipe I always have a half jar of Hatch green chiles leftover, but they never go to waste. They are a great addition to soups, pasta & rice dishes, curries, salsa, or shakshuka.

I recommend using dried hominy over canned. Cooking the hominy in the stew adds its unmistakable nutty flavor to the broth. The kernels should be soaked overnight, but in a pinch I’ve done a quick soak the same morning and let them sit at room temperature until I’m ready to use them. Properly soaked hominy takes about 3 hours to cook, so I give it a head start while I prepare the remaining ingredients. Then it cooks the rest of the way with the stew until the kernels are soft and puffed. If you prefer, you can use canned hominy, but the kernels won’t have the same toothsome texture. For 1 cup dried hominy, you’ll need 3 cups cooked. Add it when the pork is almost tender and simmer it with the stew for 20 minutes more.

To quick soak hominy or beans, bring 1 cup of the dry product and 3 to 4 cups of water to a boil in a saucepan. Shut off the heat and let it sit for at least one hour before using.

This is a perfect recipe for your multi cooker. Simmer it for 2 hours, or slow cook it gently for 6 hours. If you use the high pressure setting, you can get perfectly tender pork and hominy under an hour, but the flavors won’t have time to fully meld. Chill the stew overnight, then heat and serve it the next day. You’ll notice a big improvement.

Green Chile & Hominy Stew

A house favorite inspired by New Mexico classics, Green Chile Stew and Pozole. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to get such great flavor out of a few simple ingredients.

Ingredients, for 4 to 6 servings

1 cup dried hominy, soaked overnight
2 lbs. pork shoulder, cut in 1″ chunks
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, finely diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tablespoon chili powder
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin

4 cups chicken or pork stock
3 cups roasted Hatch green chiles
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 bay leaves
garnish:
1/2 cup finely diced raw onion
1 lime, cut in wedges
1 bunch cilantro, roughly chopped

Stovetop Directions
  1. Soak hominy for at least 8 hours in 3 cups of water. Drain, and combine with 2 cups stock and 1 cup water in a sauce pan. Add a pinch of salt and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer uncovered for 1 hour.
  2. Toss pork shoulder with salt & pepper.  In a 5 quart dutch oven or large saucepan, heat olive oil over medium heat.  Lightly brown the pork in small batches, allowing some of the fat to render.  Transfer the pork to a plate, and discard any excess oil, leaving just enough in the pan to saute the onions. 
  3. Add onions and cook 5 minutes until just beginning to soften.  Add garlic, chili powder and cumin, and cook, stirring until the garlic is fragrant.  Return the pork to the pot, and add the par-cooked hominy along with its cooking liquid. 
  4. Add the remaining stock, roasted green chiles, bay leaves and oregano.  Cover and simmer for about 1-1/2 to 2 hours until both the pork and hominy are tender. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Rest with the heat off for 20 minutes, and serve with chopped raw onion, lime juice, and cilantro.
Pressure Cooking Directions
  1. Soak hominy as directed above. Combine drained hominy with 3 cups stock in the pot of the multi cooker. Add a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of olive oil, and set the cooker at high pressure for 20 minutes.
  2. Toss pork shoulder with salt & pepper.  In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat.  Lightly brown the pork in small batches, allowing some of the fat to render.  Transfer the pork to a plate, and discard any excess oil, leaving just enough in the pan to saute the onions.
  3. Add onions and cook 5 minutes until just beginning to soften.  Add garlic, chili powder and cumin, and cook, stirring until the garlic is fragrant.  Add the remaining stock and bring the mixture to a boil.
  4. Transfer the onion-stock mixture to the pot of the multi cooker. Add the pork and any accumulated juices, the roasted green chiles, bay leaves and oregano. If necessary, add water to cover the ingredients by 1 inch.
  5. Cook at high pressure for 40 minutes. Stop the cooking cycle and allow the pressure to release naturally. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Rest with the heat off for at least 20 minutes to allow the meat to relax and the flavors to meld. As with all stews, the flavors will be even better the next day. Serve with garnishes as directed above.

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